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BST Infantry Skills – Perform Corrective action with a service rifle

Perform Corrective action with a service rifle

Training Support Package (TSP) for the Marine Battle Skills Test (BST)

 

TASK: Perform corrective action with a service rifle

CONDITION: Given a service rifle, sling, a filled magazine, cartridge belt, magazine pouch, dummy ammunition and a scenario where the service rifle has stopped firing

STANDARD: To return the weapon to service

ESTIMATED TIME TO TRAIN: 15 minutes

ESTIMATED TIME TO TEST: 5 minutes per Marine

PERFORMANCE STEPS: 
  1. Take cover as the tactical situation dictates
  2. Observe the indicators of the stoppage/malfunction
  3. Perform corrective action for the stoppage/malfunction
  4. Resume engagement
SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS:  A service rifle, sling, filled magazine with dummy ammunition, cartridge belt, magazine pouch.

PERFORMANCE STEP 1: Take cover as the tactical situation dictates.

Seek Cover (if the situation permits)

 

PERFORMANCE STEP 2: Observe the indicators of the stoppage/malfunction.

Malfunctions and stoppages are two different occurrences that can happen to the rifle that causes the rifle not to fire.

  1. Malfunction. A malfunction occurs when a part of the rifle fails to operate according to the specification. Anytime a rifle has a malfunction it will need to be fixed by an armorer or a qualified individual.
  1. Stoppage. A stoppage occurs when something interrupts the cycle of operation (hence stoppage). A stoppage can easily be fixed by the recruit and does not require an armorer or qualified individual to fix it.
  1. Once the rifle ceases firing, you must visually or physically observe the ejection port to identify the problem before they can clear it. The steps taken to clear the weapon are based on observation of one of the following three indicators:
  1. Bolt is forward or ejection port cover is closed
  1. Brass is obstructing chamber area
  1. Bolt is locked to the rear

PERFORMANCE STEP 3: Perform corrective action for the stoppage/malfunction.

Bolt Is Forward Or Ejection Port Cover Is Closed. This type of stoppage can occur when a weapon fails to feed the round from the magazine or feeds it improperly.  When the bolt is completely forward or the ejection port cover is close the following procedure is used to return the weapon to condition 1:

  1. Seek cover. (If the situation permits)
  2. Tap the bottom of the magazine.
  3. Pull the charging handle to the rear and release it.
  4. Sight in and attempt to fire.

Brass Is Obstructing The Chamber. This can indicate a double feed or a failure to eject.  Double feed is a stoppage that occurs when two rounds are forced into the chamber at the same time.  Failure to eject is a stoppage that occurs when the expelled brass casing does not sufficiently eject out of the chamber.  Procedure to return the weapon back to condition 1 when brass is observed obstructing the chamber:

  1. Seek Cover (if the situation permits).
  1. Attempt to remove the magazine.
  1. Attempt to lock the bolt to the rear.
  1. If the bolt will not lock to the rear, rotate the rifle so the ejection port is facing down; hold the charging handle to the rear as far as it will go and shake the rifle to free the round(s). If the rounds do not shake free, hold the charging handle to the rear and strike the butt of the rifle on the ground or manually clear the round.
  1. Conduct a reload.
  1. Sight in and attempt to fire.

Bolt Locked To The Rear. Although a dry weapon is not considered a true stoppage or mechanical failure, a Marine must take action to return the weapon to operation.  The appropriate procedure to get the weapon to condition 1 from observing this indicator is:

  1. Seek cover (if the situation permits)
  1. Conduct a dry reload
  1. Sight in and attempt to fire

Brass is Stuck Over and Behind the Bolt Face.  This stoppage will prevent the bolt from moving and is caused by the weapon failing to feed or extract properly.  To return the weapon to operation:

  1. Attempt to place the weapon on Safe
  1. Remove the magazine and place the butt stock on the deck
  1. Hold the bolt face to the rear with a sturdy, slender object (e.g., stripper clip, knife, Multi-Tool). Maintain rearward pressure on the bolt and simultaneously push forward on the charging handle to remove the obstructing round
  1. Check the chamber area to ensure it is clear
  1. Conduct a speed reload
  1. Sight in and attempt to fire, if applicable

Procedures For Clearing An Audible Pop.  An audible pop occurs when only a portion of the propellant is ignited. It is normally identifiable by reduced recoil and is sometimes accompanied by excessive smoke escaping from the chamber area. The only situation where you are responsible for clearing an audible pop is in a combat environment:

  1. If an audible pop occurs while in a combat environment the steps to clear the weapon are:
  1. Take cover.
  2. Place the weapon in Condition 4.
  3. Move the take down pin from left to right as far as it will go to allow the lower receiver to
  4. Remove the bolt carrier group.
  5. Inspect the bore for an obstruction from the chamber end.
  6. Insert a cleaning rod into the bore from the muzzle end and clear the obstruction.
  7. Reassemble the rifle.
  8. Conduct a reload.
  9. Sight in and attempt to fire.

PERFORMANCE STEP 4:  Resume engagement.

Once the stoppage or malfunction has been cleared, resume the engagement.

 

 

Perform corrective action with a service rifle

Evaluation Checklist

 

MARINE TRAINED:

EVALUATOR(S):

DATE:

SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS: A service rifle, sling, filled magazine with dummy ammunition, cartridge belt, magazine pouch.

EVALUATOR NOTE:  Marines must perform all the steps below without omitting key elements in order to pass this event.  The evaluator will guide the Marine through the checklist by asking questions.

Performance Step Instructor Notes Pass or Remediate
1. Take cover as the tactical situation dictates. Did the Marine simulate taking cover
2. Observe the indicators of the stoppage/malfunction. Evaluator should create a simulated stoppage.  The Marine should evaluate the stoppage to see if::

1. Bolt is forward or ejection port cover is closed

2. Brass is obstructing chamber area

3. Bolt is locked to the rear

 

3. Perform corrective action for the stoppage/malfunction. Marine should perform the appropriate corrective action to clear the stoppage.

 

4. Resume engagement. Marine should simulate resume the engagement once stoppage is cleared.

 

 

Perform Corrective action with a service rifle

Training Support Package (TSP) for the Marine Battle Skills Test (BST)